Enjoyment of silly movies and the "Karezza" lifestyle

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Went and saw the Bond movie today, Skyfall.

And movies like this are all about dopamine, it seems to me. Newer special effects, scarier situations, etc. Novelty and unpredictable rewards.

And they just aren't that interesting to me anymore. Is there such a thing as losing interest in this stuff because as they used to say kind of like "I"m high on life" but "I'm high on oxytocin" Dance 4

And I really don't mean to call this a "lifestyle" but that is really my question -- does one thing lead to another, in terms of changes in attitudes about such things as popular movies? 

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Yes

Yes, it has for us~~and you might get a small feeling that perhaps you don't *need* the things you used to think were so important (material things, junk food, hyper activities, etc.). You're already fulfilled...what more could there be to want or need?

I said in my blog a long time ago I could now die happy, lol.

(P.S. I've never seen a *single* Bond movie (nor a single Star Trek episode/movie)~~I think I may be the only person on planet Earth?? lol, probably not, but it feels that way!)

Bingo

That concept of "contentment" being due to meeting our brains where they are with lots of affection and a minimum of neurochemical fallout has always been at the core of my understanding of this practice.

I think "inner balance" is at the core of many great spiritual traditions. Most have just had trouble incorporating sex because procreation was always such a high priority that knowledge of sustainable sex without orgasm keeps getting lost. Wink But obviously, meditation, diet, prayer, etc. all help sustain inner balance, too.

Karezza is just the most enjoyable way. Kiss 3

What!

Oh my God Rachel, were you raised by wolves? No Bond movies, no Star Trek, no Star Wars, no Mission Impossible, you sound so educated I would have thought you had seen all of the classics. Most of these were made before I was even born. My parents cared enough for my education to show us old Bond movies when my brothers and I were younger—the ancient ones with Sean Connery. Without watching reruns of Star Trek how do you know what “Beam me up Scotty” means?

I could give you a list of great movies; movies where things always blowup, cars are chased, people are shot or stabled or blowup. That’s right Rachel they’re not chick flicks. Have a great Thanksgiving weekend and take your significant other to see a movie oozing testosterone.

adrenalin

Several years ago I really worked on getting over adrenalin (AKA epinephrine everywhere besides the US). It's a great chemical for responding to life or death situations, but less useful when the threat is not real and the response is sedentary. My method for getting over it was to work a bunch of short temp jobs where I had little emotional involvement. Everyone around me would be freaking out and I would ask myself "Is this life or death?" The answer would invariably be "No!" and I would breathe and relax. Now, it takes a serious threat to get an epinephrine response out of me. That shift made most Hollywood movies really boring to me. I'm not totally clear on the relationship between epinephrine and oxytocin and dopamine. It's interesting to hear that attenuating the dopamine response can make epinephrine uninteresting automatically. Huh.

Overstimulation seems to be he name of the game . . .

Overstimulation seems to be the name of the game in many things these days. Movies, restaurant foods, music (if you want to stretch the definition of what a music is) and any number of other things in life. TV strikes me as perhaps the worst offender. TV is continuous change. Try watching a TV with the volume off some time. It can get pretty bizarre. Even before rebooting I had severely curtailed my entertainment habits. I prefer gentler forms of entertainment and think that it gives me repose from the overstimulation that is everywhere.

Some of it

is prolly because many folks aren't getting the rewards of touch and close, trusted companionship that their brains are craving. That makes their brains "look around" for the next best thing...which generally takes the form of distraction and novelty.

A line from the movie Murder

A line from the movie Murder By Death comes to mind. The Charlie Chan character enters a room and the people he expected to be in there were all missing. His reply was; "room full of empty people". I suspect that you are right, there are a lot of lonely people, looking for fun but missing out on closeness, companionship and warmth in their lives. Ours is a very cold, cruel time in which to live.

yes!

This is awesome. I've had this same experience over the past 6-8 months and was wondering whether it was linked to increased meditation & other mindfulness practices. I bet it is :)

I also say Skyfall, and was so underwhelmed it wasn't even funny. I have taken to watching non-violent educational documentaries full of natural beauty instead. Check out the story of Moyenne island http://www.loveandfreedomproject.com/a-grain-of-sand-2009-documentary/ for example or Yellowstone: Battle for Life on Amazon Prime instant watch.

mr. drew wrote:

[quote=mr. drew]This is awesome. I've had this same experience over the past 6-8 months and was wondering whether it was linked to increased meditation & other mindfulness practices. I bet it is :)

I also say Skyfall, and was so underwhelmed it wasn't even funny. I have taken to watching non-violent educational documentaries full of natural beauty instead. Check out the story of Moyenne island http://www.loveandfreedomproject.com/a-grain-of-sand-2009-documentary/ for example or Yellowstone: Battle for Life on Amazon Prime instant watch.[/quote]
Likewise, I've come to prefer documentaries. Beyond the dopamine and adrenaline aspects I think that drama itself can be overstimulating. Real life, in the real world, is boring at times. Drama deals with the critical, exciting and tragic parts of life. These are things we all need to deal with from time to time but I can't see any reason to dwell on such things all the time.

Documentaries, not docu-dramas, deal in reality. They may include plenty of drama, but it's real drama, not contrived.

I agree. I have noticed this

I agree. I have noticed this also, that movies and tv are all about special effects, special effects, dopamine, and adrenaline, and the actual acting quality and ability to create the overall feeling of a movie or tv show has gone downhill.

I can watch action movies from 10-15 years ago and enjoy them much more than some of these modern movies where the camera angle is moving and changing so quickly I can't even really tell what's going on. I think they also do this to cover up sloppy choreography, too. They used to actually teach the actors a few properly done martial arts or swordplay moves before filming...