Steering clear of the pink elephant

Submitted by freedom on
Printer-friendly version

When driving, it's helpful to look where you want to go and not be too myopic about where the car is or seems to be heading. I've been trying to shift lately on not explicitly avoiding PMO as much as anything that takes a numbing form. This method is not working so well. Unlike driving, life has no road and things are non-linear. Still, I'm finding my brain is trying harder than ever to get me into whatever mischief it can. A logical conclusion is to find something to focus toward rather than to focus on avoidance. I'm not sure what I might focus on and if that could be helpful enough for me to avoid myopic spirals. 

For whatever reasons, the many positive behaviors one might do don't seem to be enough at times. There will always be some downtime or choice of what to eat, do, etc. My compass can get a bit haywire. 

Comments

Yes,

having substitute activities already planned seems to be essential for most guys.

Ever thought of hitting the gym? This site has lots of brain-balancing suggestions: www.gettingstronger.org. Gary and I personally met the man behind it in September and really like him. He's not trying to sell anything and has an in depth science background (biogenic engineer) as well as a degree in philosophy from my alma mater.

Is a substitute activity a

Is a substitute activity a focal point or is it just a temporary distraction to get over seeking?

I've not been a huge fan of weight training with machines. I seem to prefer no-gym workouts. For whatever reason, integrating fitness on a regular basis in a functional way hasn't worked well for me over the years. When I do fitness things, exercise sort of takes over my life. Obviously, there are worse things, but I'm left in a dysfunctional world where I'm not getting enough other things done. Finding a functional balance seems the challenge.

While I agree fitness in general helps one be more centered, I don't see it as a focus point on the navigational horizon short of reengineering my life to be fitness focused. I've considered that shift several times in various ways, but I see fitness more as an escape than a passion. That tells me it's not the direction in which to go, especially if I'm trying to escape less.

We're traveling at the moment

and we met with a guy who recovered from porn-induced ED. (His video is here: ▶ Porn Induced ED Reboot Advice - YouTube)

His reboot was taking forever, perhaps due to his history. He started very early on porn and his dad was an IT guy so he got highspeed early on too. He noticed a big improvement after (around 6 months?) he went with his cousin to a cabin in the wilderness and fasted for 2 to 3 days (lots of water!). He said that after that food tasted amazing and sex improved radically. It may be that some guys' dopamine "set points" are gonna need "goosing" after years of sluggishness.

I really don't know, but I'd love to see some research that tests the efficacy of different rebooting protocols.

Well, I think it was freedom

who talked about fasting early on. Since then I've heard more about it actually working for some guys.

It's so important for us humans to learn how to rebalance this part of the brain, and there's no reason that exactly the same protocol should work for everyone.

Todd Becker writes a lot about all such techniques for regulating neurotransmitters on his site: www.gettingstronger.org

You're gonna hate me

For whatever reasons, the many positive behaviors one might do don't seem to be enough at times. There will always be some downtime or choice of what to eat, do, etc. My compass can get a bit haywire.

Well, obviously the solution then is to do nothing Wink