Old Seed and Birth Defects

Submitted by Lolita on
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I've been hearing that old sperm and eggs are more likely to produce children with Down's syndrome and other birth defects. Statistically, older women have more children afflicted, presumably that their eggs have aged. I've also heard that older sperm that has been retained longer also carries an increased risk of birth defects than sperm freshly created by the testes.

I do not intend to have children, but if I did, I would want my partner to ejaculate and make me up a fresh batch to create our little one.

I wish I had a source on this to quote, but I came across it quite awhile ago.

I find this kind of thing hopelessly interesting.

Me too! Hopelessly Interesting!

I was just looking at this information about a week ago - and while I didn't keep any links to the resources, I started at the Wikipedia pages, and went from there: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semen_quality

Best quality semen would seem to be from a man who has been abstinent for 2 days. Worst - > 10 days between ejaculations, or less than 1 day.

Interesting that the best practice for fertilization would be once every three days - and that is exactly the pattern for Karezza that my partner and I have found most pleasant and satisfying, with or without orgasm.

Quizure

"There's this place in me where your fingerprints still rest, your kisses still linger, and your whispers softly echo. It's the place where a part of you will forever be a part of me." - Gretchen Kemp

Lolita wrote:I've been

[quote=Lolita]I've been hearing that old sperm and eggs are more likely to produce children with Down's syndrome and other birth defects. Statistically, older women have more children afflicted, presumably that their eggs have aged. I've also heard that older sperm that has been retained longer also carries an increased risk of birth defects than sperm freshly created by the testes.

I do not intend to have children, but if I did, I would want my partner to ejaculate and make me up a fresh batch to create our little one.

I wish I had a source on this to quote, but I came across it quite awhile ago.

I find this kind of thing hopelessly interesting.[/quote]

All the more reason to abstain from sex! Children are an exspense I don't need! LOL Wink

All life is sorrowful and the world is an ever burning fire, so enjoy the stately dance of the mystic bliss beyond pain, for that is at the heart of every mythic rite.

My genetics teacher

My genetics teacher mentioned sperm from an older male could be a problem, but not eggs from an older woman. I remember because he made a joke about how older women should seek younger male partners to have babies with.

Courage is knowing what not to fear.
-Plato

Lolita, I have a friend who

Lolita, I have a friend who had a child at 34 and he has downs syndrome. The father was younger, 28.

Quizure, like your ending quote!

JRSun, I'm following your genetics teacher's advice. . going for the younger (yet in this case somehow infinitely more mature) younger man . . . or maybe my biology is. If it's my biology speaking, my biology prefers a "mate" who loves children, also loves how he feels when he doesn't ejaculate too much, and is very affectionate to me, more so than my biology loves his long black hair, broad shoulders, hazel eyes, and other unmentionably exquisite physical attributes, tho these are a nice perk.

Recently my attitude towards my "biology" has improved, maybe because I want to follow it, with the right person and the right time. The right person has shown up, the right time hasn't yet. With partner-based birth control and karezza, intentional parenthood is possible. Just because we aren't slaves to biology doesn't mean we wont want to fulfill it's purpose. I like to think biology is happy when it finds a loving couple who knows how to intentionally conceive. This increases the likelihood of the success of the offspring. Ie, pairbonding makes sense whether you hope to fulfill or avoid biology.

Marnia, I intend the conception of my child to be much more than a business. Raising children will likely have the potential to be, like anything, a spiritual practice even if it isn't always approached that way by everyone.

Sorry for the late response,

Sorry for the late response, but I found this conversation too good to pass up. Each person has their own interesting viewpoints on the topic of age & genetics. In my opinion, I think it's a convoluted accumulation of factors. There's simply no "black and white." Period. Age can be a contributor to genetic abnormalities, but one's genetic make up can perhaps "muddy up" sequences that cause mentally debilitating conditions such as autism, down syndrome or OCD. One's genetic make-up and time of actual conception can be a major factor in one's risk for certain cancers (ex: breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, chordoma, etc) if such conditions run in the family, of course. The very combination of these factors is, essentially, what makes up an individual with different needs.

Family Interest

[quote=PattyCat]Sorry for the late response, but I found this conversation too good to pass up. Each person has their own interesting viewpoints on the topic of age & genetics. In my opinion, I think it's a convoluted accumulation of factors. There's simply no "black and white." Period. Age can be a contributor to genetic abnormalities, but one's genetic make up can perhaps "muddy up" sequences that cause mentally debilitating conditions such as autism, down syndrome or OCD. One's genetic make-up and time of actual conception can be a major factor in one's risk for certain cancers (ex: breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, chordoma, etc) if such conditions run in the family, of course. The very combination of these factors is, essentially, what makes up an individual with different needs.[/quote]

[quote=Marnia]Thanks for chiming in
What brought you to the site?[/quote]

Hi Marnia!
The reason I'm on here is because I'm looking into my family's history as well as their medical history. This conversation was actually pretty interesting, so I thought I'd contribute. :)