Reaching out to the purveyors of pornography

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So, I was thinking, you guys and gals have built up a community that, unintentional as it may be, has become focused on the rehabilitation of men and women from addictive thought patterns. Chiefly, porn addiction. The practice of sacred sex is the ultimate goal that this site pushes its readers toward, but most people here (as far as I can tell) are still recovering porn addicts, myself included.

What about those that publish pornography?

Think about it: they have many connections in their industry, to people that are just like them and going through the same addictive life style. As they are responsible for a share of the pornography they are addicted to, that share would dry up and disappear off the face of this Earth (or at least their site(s) would) if they themselves broke free of the addiction, and sought to make an honest living. With their vast porn connections, may come influence over others in the industry, and their own viewership, to change in the same way.

Do you think it would be beneficial to reach out to porn publishers, actors and actresses, etc. and expose them to the material on Reuniting? If so, what approaches would you recommend for communicating with them?

Nope, not a Chance

I'm a pessimist by nature, so I enjoy saying no to everything (including my own happiness :) ).

But joking aside, no, it would never work. Here's why.

1.) Porn is money first, addiction second. This is important. I have a co-worker who's friend is in the porn business. As she herself would describe this friend "Nice, beautiful, responsible mother. You'd never suspect she owned a porn shop. She's not into kinky things or any of that, although she meets porn stars and stuff all the time. And she makes a lot of money."

This is the key here. A woman who, herself, is perfectly "normal" by any social standard. She's not in the porn business because she likes or is obsessed with porn herself. She probably hardly indulges in any of the stuff she sells. And yet, she's selling it. Because it makes money.

2.) The porn industry is virulently "sex-positive". Of course, that's a loaded word, hence the quotations. Reuniting, to most people who glance at the site, seems absolutely oppressive. Ironically, this place is actually very, very, very open and non-judgmental. But people's addictions to orgasm are more powerful than most would believe. I could see a few porn industry folks being moved by this place. But there are thousands of people in the porn industry now. Changing 10 or 20 won't make a dent.

3.) Ultimately, people have to want to change. They have to want to seek things out and discover it for themselves. No amount of PSAing about porn, addiction to orgasm, or sacred sex is going to change things. The culture has to get tired of the status quo first, then seek a new paradigm, or else it simply isn't satisfying or meaningful.

So in essence, I think exhausting resources on trying to "convert" the porn industry is a fruitless endeavor. Reach out to the people who are ready, instead of trying to inform the masses that are currently riding on the zenith of the porn enterprise. It's only getting bigger right now. Now is not really the time to "attack" persay, when things are going so "good".

Of course, I don't own this place, so I'm speaking hot air.

"1.) Porn is money first,

"1.) Porn is money first, addiction second."

True in a lot of cases, especially the higher up you go on the corporate ladder. However, there is one person I had in mind to contact, who I strongly suspect (from his blog postings) this isn't the case for.

"She probably hardly indulges in any of the stuff she sells. And yet, she's selling it. Because it makes money."

Is she ignorant of what she does to her customers? If so, how do you think her life would change if she was no longer ignorant?

"But there are thousands of people in the porn industry now. Changing 10 or 20 won't make a dent."

That depends on which 10 or 20 are changed, does it not? That's why I suggest first and foremost targeting the publishers. Most effective spot to shoot somebody is in the head.

"Reuniting, to most people who glance at the site, seems absolutely oppressive."

*blink*... really? My first exposure to the idea of orgasm as a harmful phenomenon was from the Samaelian community of Gnostics, whose harsh and abstract spiritual rhetoric sharply contrasts with this community's far more inclusive and scientifically minded language. When I started visiting this site more often, I thought that its approach was perfect for getting people to stop ruining themselves. But, perhaps you are right. I don't know... I've never been in the position of being so identified with porn that I stopped questioning myself, but maybe those directly involved in the porn industry are truly a lost cause.

".) Ultimately, people have to want to change. They have to want to seek things out and discover it for themselves. No amount of PSAing about porn, addiction to orgasm, or sacred sex is going to change things."

Not if there's a scientific basis for it. It's a sad fact, but people have come to worship science, defending their attachment to orgasm with one or more old, short-sighted studies. If there's a way to convince people to stop publishing porn, it's most likely a personally targeted, chemical play-by-play of how they make themselves and others around them miserable on a daily basis, backed up with solid research. Anything less exact than that would probably be immediately dismissed by them as a repressive mentality.

Is porn or money more

Is porn or money more addictive? Or do they go hand in hand? Can they earn a comparable living doing something else?

You might want to start with the anti-porn community. They can seem like an angry bunch at times.

There are many people who have left the porn community and likely have something to say.

You could push your congressman to add to the disclosure notice requirement a link to sites such as this and others.

My thought is that

the only thing that will make a dent in porn's popularity is getting the word out that it's often linked to ED...and helping young men understand that if they are having ED, it is *completely abnormal.* I think some of them honestly don't know this, and can't connect the problem with porn because hotter porn always "cures" their problem...until it doesn't anymore because their brains get so numb to pleasure.

So my question is, "How can we get the word out about ED?" Gary's about to start working on another powerpoint presentation - on this very subject, so be thinking of ideas about where to post it.

there is no chance in hell

there is no chance in hell that the purveyors can be reached. not at all. not even close. not ever. perhaps some of the small players on the very low rungs, but that would be it. that industry is much more pernicious than the 'naughty' image it projects.