A new mindset, a new world.

Submitted by wings on
Printer-friendly version

Hi,
It's been a while since I last visited these forums, and so much has happened since I asked that oh-so-simple question "what is spirituality". That question started my journey into the mind.

I began reading a lot and discovered buddhism, and found that basically all the values of buddhism are in complete harmony with my own. It was a revelation - an atheistic religion based on experience instead of faith. I struggled to find a simple aspect of buddhism that wasn't part of my own mindset, and the only thing that bothered me was the idea of reincarnation. That, however, I have come to see differently, albeit perhaps not in an orthodox buddhist way...But I digress.

One of the most valuable lessons I have learned is that aggression, in all its shapes, are "toxic" to the mind. This has become so entrenched in my thinking that it has become my first religious principle. There is nothing constructive in aggression - it is always destructive, no matter how you look at it. This principle has completely changed me, and to my great joy, it has also changed the life of people around me. A religious principle is a truly powerful thing.

Aggression is only one of three phenomena that are toxic to the mind. The other two are wanting (lust and desire) and ignorance. I do consider those to be toxic as well, and they have also played a large part in forming my newfound mindset.

Here's another aspect - I don't really consider myself a buddhist. I dislike labels. I have also embraced forgiveness from Christianity - I find that it is an enormous help, and I often wonder why the concept does not really exist in buddhism. Forgiveness, however, is intertwined with letting go of aggression, and that is one of the connections between the two religions. While most of my values coincide with those of buddhism, they also happen to be in agreement with Christian values.

This website promotes non-orgasmic sex. That was the stepping stone for me into spirituality. While I have not exactly followed the ideas of non-orgasmic sex, it has meant that I now am a different person. I know what my life is going to be about. Happiness is the only goal we all strive for, and that means, for me, meditation. I have made no vow of celibacy, but neither have I decided to actively go look for carnal love. I have no idea about the future, and I don't plan on making any.

All we need to be happy is in our minds. We need nothing but what we always have had. It makes no sense that outside phenomena will make us happy, since they do no really exist the way we perceive them to exist. What we "love" is really not the actual object of affection, but our idea of it.

Well, that was a lot of information - I'll stop now, because long posts can be boring, I know. But I am very open to discuss spirituality and the ideas I have mentioned, so feel free to comment.

Welcome back

It's good to hear about the developments in your spiritual life since your visit.

One thing that made sense to me in something I read is that if you define "aggression" broadly enough, it encompasses creativity....the energy needed to bring things into the the world. Where does that fit into Buddhist thought?

Poisons of the mind

[quote=Marnia]It's good to hear about the developments in your spiritual life since your visit.

One thing that made sense to me in something I read is that if you define "aggression" broadly enough, it encompasses creativity....the energy needed to bring things into the the world. Where does that fit into Buddhist thought?[/quote]

Thank you, Marnia. I am so impressed by your never-ending enthusiasm and positivity :)

You would really have to broaden aggression to encompass creativity. There are several definitions of the 3 "poisons of the mind" in Buddhism. Another is "hate, anger, lust, desire and ignorance" - basically, it's saying the same thing. Using that definition, it would be impossible to include creativity.

If the energy to create comes from hate or anger, I would think that kind of creativity is misguided and unwholesome.